Indians Friendly to White Men Here….


New Britain herald. [volume],

October 08, 1927, FINAL EDITION, Page 3, Image 3

https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/

New Britain herald. August 09, 1922, Image 7 –
Scotts Swamp – Oldest in New England

The Indian Races of North and South America…
By: Charles De Wolf Brownel
pg’s: 222-228

Pequot remnants, 1655……..

The tyranny and exactions of Uncas over the Pequots who had become subject to him, aroused their indignation; while his treachery towards his own people, and alliance with the whites, secured him the hostility of every neigh boring tribe. He was engaged in perpetual quarrels with Ninigret, a celebrated Nehantic sachem; with Sequassen, whose authority at an earlier date extended over the Tunxis tribe, at the westward of the Connecticut; and with the grieved and revengeful Narragansetts.

Whenever these interminable disputes were brought be fore the court of the New England commissioners, the decisions of that body appear to have favored the Mohegan. Assisted by the counsel of a crafty and subtle Indian, named Foxun or Poxen, who served him in the capacity of chief advocate and adviser, and whose wisdom and sagacity were widely noted, he generally managed to explain away his iniquities; at least so far as to satisfy an audience already prejudiced in his favor. When his crimes were not to be concealed, a reprimand and caution were generally the extent of his punishment.

On the other hand, when suspicions arose against the Narragansetts, the most prompt and violent proceedings were re sorted to: the payment of an immense amount of wampum was exacted; the delivery of hostages from among the principal people of the tribe was demanded; and threats of war and extermination were used to humble and humiliate them.

In September, 1655, a few of the scattered Pequots who had not joined the forces of Uncas, were allowed a resting-place by the commissioners, upon a portion of the south eastern sea-coast of Connecticut, and their existence as a separate tribe was formally acknowledged.

This little remnant of the crushed and overthrown nation had been, for some time, under the guidance of two self-constituted sachems, one commonly called Robin Cassinament, a Pequot, and the other Cushawashet, a nephew of Ninigret, known among the English as Hermon Garret.

They had formed small settlements upon the tract now allotted to them, which they were allowed to retain upon payment of tribute, in wampum, to the colonies, and the adoption of a prescribed code of laws. Their governors were to be chosen by the English; and Cushawashet and Cassinament received the first appointment.

It will readily be perceived to what an extent the power and control of the colonists over the affairs of the Indians in their vicinity, had increased, even at this early period. The natives were now glad to settle down under the protection of their masters; to pay yearly tribute as amends for former hostilities; and to hire the lands of which they had been so short a time previous the undisturbed possessors.

It is pitiful to read of the coarse coats, the shovels, the hoes, the knives, and jews-harps, in exchange for which they had parted with their broad lands. Utterly improvident, and incapable of foreseeing, or hopeless of averting the ascendancy of the whites, they yielded to their exactions, and submitted to their dictation.

Sauntering indolently about the settlements, and wasting their energies by excess in the use of the novel means of excitement offered by “strong waters,” they lost much of that native pride, dignity, and self-respect which distinguished them when intercourse with foreigners first commenced. Their numbers, which appear to have been grossly exaggerated, even in their most flourishing days, were rapidly diminishing; their game was becoming scarce and the refinements and comforts of civilization, rude indeed as compared to what now exists, presented to their eyes at the white settlements, only aggravated the consciousness of their own poverty and distress.

The Tunxis and Podunk Indians, who inhabited either side of the Connecticut, in the vicinity of the English settlements; the Quinnipiacs on the sound, where New Haven now stands; the Nehantics, to the eastward of the river; and the feeble Pequot settlement, were subject to, or in effect, under the control of the colonists: Uncas was their “friend and fast ally;” and the Narragansetts, though under suspicion of various treacherous plans, were nominally at peace with the whites, and quelled by the terror of their arms.

This condition of affairs continued, with the exception of the great and final struggle between the colonists and the natives, known as Philip’s war to be detailed in a succeeding article until the death of Uncas, about the year 1682. He left the title to his extensive domains involved in inextricable confusion. In consequence of deeds and grants from himself and his sons Owenoco and Attawanhood, to various individuals among the white settlers, and for various purposes, the effect of which conveyances were probably unknown to the grantors, numerous contradictory claims arose. The same tracts were made over to different persons; one grant would extend over a large portion of another; and, to crown all, Uncas, in the year 1659, had aliened his whole possessions by deed, regularly witnessed, to John Mason, of Norwich. This conveyance was evidently intended by the sachem merely to confer a general power as overseer or trustee upon a man whom he considered as friendly to his interests, and whose knowledge would prove a protection against the overreaching of pro posed purchasers. According to the Indian understanding of the transaction was the claim of Mason and his heirs, who arrogated to themselves no further interest or authority than that above specified. The Connecticut colony, by virtue of a general deed of “surrender of jurisdiction,” obtained from Mason, insisted on an unqualified property in the whole domain.

Owenoco succeeded his father as sachem of the Mohegans, and pursued a similar course to secure his lands, conveying them to the sons of Mason as trustees. His Indian improvidence and intemperance led him to disregard this arrangement, and to give deeds of various tracts included in the trust conveyance, without the knowledge or assent of the overseer. In July, of the year 1704, in order to settle the conflicting claims of the whites and Indians, and to restore to the tribe the portions illegally obtained from them, a royal commission was obtained from England, by some friends of the Mohegans, to examine and settle the disputed questions.

The colony protested against the proceeding, denying the authority of the crown to determine upon the matter, and refused to appear before the commissioners. The conduct of the case being exparte, a decision was given in favor of the Mohegans, restoring them to a vast extent of territory alleged to have been obtained from their sachems when intoxicated, or by other under-hand and illegal courses. From this decree the Connecticut colony appealed, and a new commission was granted, but with no decisive result, and the case remained unsettled for more than half a century from the time of its commencement.

Owenoco lived to an advanced age, becoming, before his death, a helpless mendicant, and subsisting, in company with his squaw, upon the hospitality of the neighboring settlers. His son Caesar was his successor as sachem.

Ben, the youngest son of Uncas, of illegitimate birth, succeeded Caesar, to the exclusion of the rightful heir, young Mamohet, a grandson of Owenoco.

Mason now renewed his claims, and, accompanied by his two sons, carried Mamohet to England, that he might present a new petition to the reigning monarch. A new commission was awarded, but both the applicants died before it was made out. “When the trial finally came on in 1738, distinguished counsel were employed on both sides, in anticipation of an arduous and protracted contest; but by a singular course of collusion and artifice, which it were too tedious to detail, the decision of 1705, on the first commission, was repealed, and the Connecticut claims supported. This was appealed from by the Masons, and good cause appearing, a new trial was decreed.

Five commissioners, men of note from New York and New Jersey, met at Norwich in the summer of 1743, and the great case brought in auditors and parties in interest from far and near. The claims, and the facts offered in support of them, were strangely intricate and complex: counsel appeared in behalf of four sets of parties, viz.: the Connecticut colony; the two claimants of the title of Sachem of the Mohegans, Ben and John, a descendant of the elder branch; and those in possession of the lands in question.

The decree was in favor of the colony, which was sustained on the concluding examination of the case in England. Two of the commissioners dissented. The Mohegans still retained a reservation of about four thou sand acres.

Their number reduced to a few hundred; distracted by the uncertain tenure of their property, and the claims of the rival sachems; mingled with the whites in contentions, the merits of which they were little capable of comprehending; with drunkenness and vice prevalent among them; the tribe was fast dwindling into insignificance. Restrictive laws, forbidding the sale of ardent spirits to the Indians, were then, as now, but of little effect.

Of the celebrated and warlike tribes of the Mohegans and Pequots, only a few miserable families now remain upon their ancient territory. These are mostly of mixed blood, and little of the former character of their race is to be seen in them except its peculiar vices. They are scantily supported by the rents of the lands still reserved and appropriated to their use. A number of the Mohegans removed to the Oneida district, in New York, some years since, but a few still remain near the former head quarters of their tribe, and individuals among them retain the names of sachems and warriors noted in the early ages of the colonies.

Much interest attaches to the efforts which have been made for the instruction and improvement of this remnant of the Mohegan nation; especially as connected with the biography of Samuel Occum, their native preacher; one of the few Indians who have been brought under the influence of civilization, and have acquired a liberal education.

In reviewing the character and history of these, as of most of the native tribes, and reflecting upon their steady and hopeless decline before the European immigrants, we cannot but feel influenced by contradictory sympathies. Their cruelties strike us with horror; their treachery and vices disgust us; but, with all this, we still may trace the tokens of a great and noble spirit. It is painful to reflect that this has more and more declined as their communion with the whites has become the more intimate. They have lost their nationality, and with it their pride and self-respect; the squalid and poverty-stricken figures hanging about the miserable huts they inhabit, convey but a faint idea of the picture that the nation presented when in a purely savage state; when the vices of foreigners had not, as yet, contaminated them, nor their superior power and knowledge disheartened them by the contrast.

Some research book links for you!


Collected by: Coni Dubois

I have been collecting research books and links to free downloads – these are all from Google Books which are easy to download and add to your library.

  1. Westerly (Rhode Island) and its witnesses: for two hundred and fifty years, 1626-1876 : including Charlestown, Hopkinton, and Richmond until their separate organization, with the principal points of their subsequent history (Google eBook): http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=oNAaMBIFWtcC&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  2. A history of New England: containing historical and descriptive sketches of the counties,cities and principal towns of the six New England states, including, in its list of contributors, more than sixty literary men and women, representing every county in New England (Google eBook): http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=8sRWAAAAMAAJ&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  3. Indian dictionary, English, German, Iroquois – the Onondaga and Algonquin – the Delaware (Google eBook): http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=UBkOAAAAIAAJ&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  4. Algonquin Indian Tales  (Google eBook): http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=9Fsn3Bt1fysC&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  5.  Memoir of Eliot: apostle to the North American Indians (Google eBook): http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=kWNAAAAAYAAJ&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  6. Life of John Eliot, the apostle to the Indians (Google eBook):  http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=PNU5AAAAcAAJ&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  7. Oyster Bay town records, Volume 1 (Google eBook): http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=afETAAAAYAAJ&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  8. Oyster Bay town records 1653-1878: http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=Pj6YNz-MdvEC&printsec=frontcover&output=reader&source=webstore_bookcard
  9. Early Long Island: a colonial study (Google eBook): http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=8YV8kAhwjQYC&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  10. Proceedings of the New York State Historical Association – Volume 6 (Google eBook): http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=i9sTAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&output=reader&source=webstore_bookcard
  11. Memoirs of a captivity among the Indians of North America: from childhood to the age of nineteen: with anecdotes descriptive of their manners and customs (Google eBook): http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=Y1tXVZ5epgwC&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  12. A history of the Pequot War: or,  A relation of the war between the powerful nation of Pequot Indians,  once inhabiting the coast of New-England, westerly from near Narragansett Bay and the English inhabitants, in the year 1638 (Google eBook): http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=KttlnkyxvTEC&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  13. The New England Company of 1649 and John Eliot: The ledger for the years 1650-1660 and the record book of meetings between 1656 and 1686 of the Corporation for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England (Google eBook): http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=XMMGAAAAMAAJ&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  14. Indian paths in the great Metropolis (Google eBook):  http://books.google.com/ebooks/reader?id=2O-FAAAAIAAJ&num=10&printsec=frontcover&output=reader
  15. The Christian Commonwealth or The Civil Policy Of The Rising Kingdom of Jesus Christ. Written before the Interruption of the Government,by Mr. John Eliot, Teacher of the Churchof Christ at Roxbury in New-England. AndNow Published (after his consent given) by a Serverof the Season –  http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1021&context=libraryscience

Found some more Newspaper articles on the Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village….


Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village Gathering is POSTPONED till 2021!


It truly is breaking my heart to make this decision…but feel it is the best thing to do…. After talking to town official’s, donors and those planning on attending – they have all stated it would be best to postpone our upcoming 2020 Barkhamsted Lighthouse gathering.

Due to several factors: virus, economy and many people not going to be able to attend due to loss of jobs and or money not available… We feel this is the best decision to make.

I truly am sorry about this… Want to post it now so that those that made reservations can cancel and get money back before time is up for refunds.

I will be updating event calendar with new dates once I get it all planned.

Once again I apologise for any inconveniences this might bring.

Many hugs,
Coni Dubois

Email: coni@conidubois.com
Website: conidubois.com

Join other researcher’s & descendant’s in our group on Facebook Group’s at: Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village

A small change to this blog~


HI everyone!
I am just updating a few things and wanted to let you know that my blog has changed a little bit… It is still called an “Ever Widening Circle,” but it is now called a “Quest for our Ancestral Roots.” (conidubois.com)

Doing genealogy for well over 30 years now (started at 17 and I’m almost 53 now – so for a very long time), I have uncovered many wonderful stories, and it involves Colonial & Native American along with so much American history. Consequently, with that said, I am broadening my blog to include all I find and not just the Native American research I do. I have so much to share. Will be updating more once I get through the 2020 Lighthouse Gathering I am hosting in July~

I want to note: My blog also has my cousin – John Gilbert, as an Author, who has been researching the Gilbert side of us (Maternal line). He has uncovered so much & I can’t wait to see what he finds in the future.

Can view more on his other work on his blog: http://gilbertforge.com/
Gilbert research: http://gilbertforge.com/genealogy.html
Wikipedia Links he created:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilberts_of_Compton
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Scott_Robertson

Question of William H Barber Burial/Tombstone?


I have been informed of a comment via JoannBarberClupper on Find A Grave. She has stated in her comment that the tombstone posted on his Find A Grave (# 62768815) “is not his tombstone. I would like to clear up this issue of William Henry Barber tombstone!

I want to CLEARLY STATE “THAT IT IS HIS TOMBSTONE!

I personally took the photo she has questioned and the photo WAS taken at his grave site along with confirming it with the office personally~

I spent the weekend researching and visiting the grave site and that of other Ancestors in the area. Even visited the “Barber homestead” along with visiting with living family member’s that were at the funeral along with spending a day in the records to dig up all we could find.

Photo notes in my records.

Reason for the confusion: The tombstone was bought several years later (confirmed by family) and the wrong birth date was put on it at that time – He was born in 1857 and it states 1861this was done by uncertain dates and family being incorrect on the date.

BUT IT IS FOR CERTAIN HIS TOMBSTONE!

Cathy Genella has also ‘re-confirmed’ info herself and received an email with this info for us.

Via Cathy to me: I asked him where does he get the info from, he stated the previous Sexton put it all on a spreadsheet.

Via the now Sexton? to Cathy:
Cathy,
I apologize for my timing I hope this will answer any questions.
William Barber owned 8 sites, 6-11-A through 6-11-H.

Burials are as follows.

6-11-A Open 6-11-E Beulah Barber
6-11-B Maryette Barber 6-11-F George Barber
6-11-C William Barber 6-11-G Open
6-11-D Allen A Barber 6-11-H Allan A Barber Jr.

The Township has no record of sale for sites, Allan A Barber was buried in 1926. That is the earliest burial there. I found no reference to a baby being buried unless that is Allan Barber Jr.

Note from Coni: Just adding his info I have along with obit & death certificate here for you also~

Oak Grove Cemetery
Location: on South Branch Road north of South Branch, Ogemaw, Michigan. Oak Grove Cemetery is located on E. County Line Rd. in South Branch, Goodar Twp. The nearest major town is South Branch, MI.

latitude – longitude: coordinates of N 44.4789 and W -83.88638.

Barber, William Henry 8/22/1857 – 1/12/1945
Father – Age 87 – Husband of Mary

Other’s buried here:
Barber, Allen A 22 y 1926
Barber, Clia Marion 1 x 1919
Barber, Jackie William 3dys x 1930
Barber, Melvin L 60 y 1980
Barber, Myron Allen 61 y 1988
Barber, Olive M 80 y 1983
Barber, Peggy Rosella 15 y 1949
Barber, Stacy ng y ng
Barber, Verna 2 hrs x 1972
Barber, William H 88 y 1945
Barber, William Henry 70 y 1962

http://files.usgwarchives.net/…/ogemaw/cem…/cem_oakgrove.txt

http://www.usgwarchives.net/mi/tsphoto/ogemaw/oakgrove.htm

William Barber, 87 Of Hill Township Buried January 9
Left 12 Children, 62 Grand and 50 Great-Grandchildren
Funeral Services for William Henry Barber, an early settler of Hill township, were held from his late farm home between North and South Dease lakes at 2:00 o’clock on Tuesday afternoon of this week, January 16, and from the South Branch Church at 2:30 P.M. Rev. Frank H. Collin Officiated, and burial took place in the South Branch Cemetery, His age was 87. William H. Barber died at 7 o’clock Friday morning of last week, January 12, from the infirmities of age. He was born in Pennsylvania on August 26, 1857, and came to Ogemaw about fifty years ago from Owosso, where he married on November 13, 1881, to the former Maryette Clark.
He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Margette Clark Barber; 12 Children; Grant Barber of Bay City; Matthew, of Newberry; Judson, of Jackson; William and Stacy of Long Lake, Iosco County; George, of Hale; Erwin, of Goodrich; Mrs. Ada Thayer, of Curtis, Mich.; Mrs. Mary Rowbottom and Mrs. Minnie Craiger, both of Flint; Mrs. Anna Riley of Selkirk; Mrs. Nellie Ballard, of Bay City; one sister Mrs. Rose Short, of Mancelona, Mich.; 62 grandchildren and 50 great-grandchildren.

Roxanne Wehnes response to the comment sent to her from JoannBarberClupper.

The July 2020 Gathering has been postponed till 2021!


Hey Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village Descendants & Followers:

Due to what is happening in this world… we have postponed our event for next year.

The July 2021 Gathering Newsletter will be updated soon~

Please SHARE to your families so we can get it out there~

Everything abt the 3 day event is in THIS newsletter~

Note: There is A LOT of links in this PDF & I am finding a few I need to correct… please let me know if you run across any. Please include the page # and link/title~

ALSO more exciting NEWS!!

Post Commander of the Riverton American Legion Post 159 (Ted Sweeney) called me yesterday about the 2020 Barkhamsted Lighthouse Gathering’s 3 day event… He is wanting to take our group on a tour of Pahke’s Cave after our July 2nd event at the Lighthouse site 😁 Orrain (Orrin) Wright married Mercy Elwell (Cooke 1st marriage) (of the Lighthouse) and lived and had several children in Pahke’s cave for many years (children were later taken and indentured out) I have yet to make a actual connection to any of the 12 children’s descendants~

View MORE on this on my Facebook Post

Super excited to finally be able to visit the site! I will be adding this to the newsletter and updating soon!

All are free to join in on the tour!!! (AS with all other events!)

Some other links for you:

Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village Facebook Group

Barkhamsted Newspapers Collection done by Coni Dubois

James Chagum Chief of the Barkhamsted Lighthouse (this is my 661 page research book)

If you are a descendant then make sure you sign in at our Roll Call!

Is Henrietta (L) Webster that married Rev. A P Viets a Lighthouse Descendant?


Answer is NO…. by my research…

Both Henrietta Webster’s (YES there is 2 of them) they were both born in Litchfield Connecticut abt 1838 – One was born to Montgumery Webster – wife Sybil Elwell of the Lighthouse Tribe in Barkhamsted CT & the other one was born to David Sanford Webster – wife Clarissa Wattles in Bethlehem, CT

ONLY record found for Barkhamsted Lighthouse Descendant Henrietta Webster is a 1850 Census which she was 12 years old via this census
Note: Census was taken in NOVEMBER of 1850
Also by 1851 Sybil (Elwell) Webster past away
I am unsure as to what happen to all of the children…
Henrietta would of been abt 13 at the time of passing.
As you will see in my research; the 2nd Harietta L Webster was well documented throughout history – I was able to find A LOT of info on her and the Viets family.

Now let’s take a look at some important records:

Rev. A P Viets in the Connecticut, Town Marriage Records, pre-1870
(Barbour Collection)

Name: Rev. A P Viets Marriage Date: 4 Sep 1848
Marriage Place: Barkhamsted, Connecticut, USA Residence Place: Canton
Spouse: Hannah Webster Spouse Residence Place: Barkhamsted

Note: Hannah could of been a ‘nickname’?

I want to note: this is actually 2 entries – my best guess is they got the license in Sept. and married in Oct. (Was a mistake on original document which states her name as “Hannah “(which could of been a nickname) the spelling of her name appears to be Henriette vs Henrietta via this record but in all other records; it is recorded as Henrietta so went with this spelling in my research.

Rev A P Viets in the U.S., Newspaper Extractions from the Northeast, 1704-1930
Name: Rev A P Viets Event: Marriage Marriage Date: 9 Oct 1848
Marriage Place: Pleasant Valley Spouse: Henrietta Louisa Webster
Spouse Father: D Sanford Webster Newspaper: Christian Secretary
Publication Date: 13 Oct 1848 Publication Place: Connecticut, USA
Call Number: 486549

Publication Date: 13 Oct 1848 by the Christian Secretary
As you see in this record it states she is the daughter of D. Sanford Webster

Rev A P Viets in the U.S., Newspaper Extractions from the Northeast, 1704-1930
Name: Rev A P Viets Event: Marriage Marriage Date: 9 Oct 1848
Marriage Place: Pleasant Valley Spouse: Henrietta Louisa Webster
Spouse Father: D Sandford Webster Newspaper: The Hartford Times
Publication Date: 14 Oct 1848 Publication Place: Connecticut, USA
Call Number: 486551

Henrietta Louisa Webster in the North America, Family Histories, 1500-2000
(Pg 103) Viets Genealogy
Name: Henrietta Louisa Webster Gender: Female
Birth Date: 11 Jun 1830 Birth Place: Bethlehem, Conn
First Marriage Date: 9 Oct 1848 Spouse: Apollos Phelps Viets
Child:
Ellsworth Phelps Berkley Viets
Wordsworth Bertrand Viets
John Charles Viets
Mary Louisa Viets
Beulah Ruth Viets
Henrietta Claribel Viets

Now let’s take a look at the burial of the family:

All mentioned below are buried at Riverside Cemetery in Waterbury, CT.

Apollos Phelps Viets in the Connecticut, Hale Collection of Cemetery Inscriptions and Newspaper Notices, 1629-1934
Name: Apollos Phelps Viets Age: 89 Birth Date: 1819 Death Date: 1908
Burial Place: Connecticut, USA Cemetery: Riverside Cemetery

AND right below them is her PARENTS: David S. & His wife Clarissa and her sister Mary (Webster) & her husband Wilfred L. Horton
This confirms that David S & Clarissa are Henrietta L. Webster’s parents and she is NOT the Henrietta Webster of the Barkhamsted Lighthouse Site.

It always saddens me when I disprove a line…

The “only way plausible” is if there is 2 Rev./Clergyman A P Viets also…..

Coni